“Capitol Hill — Washington, DC” by VinothChandar

It was recently revealed that right-wing organization Turning Points USA bussed as many as 3200 Trump fascists (“80+ buses”) to the Capitol for his event on January 6th and arranged for their accommodation in Washington D.C. to a degree that is still unknown. Now its founder, Charlie Kirk, is wiping his record of support on Twitter and backtracking. It’s a cliché, but one worth repeating here: rats are the first to jump ship. It is also worthwhile to use this moment to correctly measure this political movement’s grassroots credibility and get a sense of what is really at work.

TPUSA…


It’s 8:00pm on the corner of 10th Street and Biscayne Boulevard, just a few hundred yards from Pérez Art Museum, where President Donald Trump is participating in a televised town hall event. Trump and Biden supporters carrying signs and flags are being held on opposite sides of the street by mounted- and bicycle police. Each side has megaphones, chanting, trading slogans, and insulting each other while media records them from the safety of the median. The Trump crowd is a good deal larger than Biden’s; in it is a major figure in the Trumpian landscape — Enrique Tarrio, chairman of…


Election season is truly underway now that a state has held a meltdown-free primary. With another Bernie Sanders victory in New Hampshire behind us, mainstream media outlets that gave his campaign short shrift are finally acknowledging that he is the frontrunner in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. But as we gear up for another debate (and welcome Michael Bloomberg to the stage after an absurd DNC rule change), let me raise an olive branch to the rest of the field: each has at least some part of their policy platform I can get behind, as demonstrated in the…


In 2016, candidate Trump effectively distinguished himself from his competitors, both in the Republican primary and in the general election, by denouncing their embrace of failed military adventurism. How distant that seems as of last Friday, after he ordered a drone strike on Iranian Major General Qasem Soleimani in Iraq, a blatantly unlawful act by both domestic and international legal standards. I’ve found myself laughing at the absurdity of it, thinking of how the American public needed to be primed with nearly two years of lies before our leaders started a war in our names in 2003. …


“IMG_5530” by cornstalker is licensed under CC BY 2.0

The progressive policy platform today is gaining support, from local office to the Democratic presidential primary. Medicare for All (M4A) is emerging as a pillar of this movement, a bold endeavor to restructure the delivery of healthcare throughout the country. If enacted, every American would receive healthcare free at the point of service, as is the case in most of the developed world. The question that remains is whether such a major change stands a chance in our political climate. Given that our last president just took his shot at reform with the Affordable Care Act (ACA), it’s worth comparing…


It has been a little over a month since Bolivia’s contested election, and about two weeks since Evo Morales, its longest-serving president and first indigenous leader, escaped to Mexico under threat from his own military. A major newspaper like The New York Times holds an enormous responsibility in relating this historic series of events to American and international audiences, and so far, its coverage has proven problematic on multiple fronts. Looking back at the Times’ reporting in cases similar to Bolivia today, this is unfortunately typical of our paper of record.

I looked at NYT articles from around the time…


Nate Silver and his FiveThirtyEight politics blog pride themselves on analytical rigor divorced from ideology, and for a good while, they apparently lived up to that. FiveThirtyEight were very close in their predictions for the 2008 presidential election, and they cemented their reputation by correctly calling every state the next time around in 2012. But it’s been a bumpy road since then. 2016 made fools of most of us, and Silver was no exception, although it should be pointed out that he was less wrong than other prominent outlets. But hey, any statistician will tell you that no one bats…


By AFGE — 2016 National Action Network King Day Breakfast, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=76666103

Are certain political careers irredeemable? Ones that didn’t necessarily result in scandal or shame, but where policy decisions that had wide-ranging effects crumble under retrospection? If someone with such a career in public office re-emerges with a genuinely laudable goal, apparently pursued in good faith, how much trust should we have in them? I open with that annoying string of questions because Eric Holder has taken up a new cause in Democratic politics, and I’m not sure how I feel about it.

As Attorney General, Holder was the country’s top law enforcement official in the midst of the financial crisis…


A couple of disheartening news headlines I came across recently have wedged themselves in my mind. The first was concerning a new report from the UN about our cavalier destruction of the world’s wilderness, and how it’s a crisis at least as troubling as the related one of climate change. One of the major causes is land conversion for farming. The second was a link to an article about a BBC nature documentary of said destruction in Borneo, with an orangutan attempting to fight a bulldozer (can we make him a special envoy to the UN?). I have to admit…

David Mazzucchi

David Mazzucchi is a freelance journalist and co-host of the Pod Me Us political podcast. He is an expert of nothing.

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